FCC Proposes New Privacy Rules for Internet Service Providers

The FCC proposes that ISPs obtain affirmative opt-in consent for the use and sharing of customer data that has not been specifically collected for the purpose of providing broadband Internet related services.



Extract from article by Alana Kirkland

On March 10, 2016, the Federal Communications Commission (“FCC”) proposed new privacy and data security rules for Internet service providers (“ISPs”) that, if passed, would regulate how ISPs collect, use, share, and protect customers’ data. The notice of proposed rulemaking (“NPRM”) that FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler circulated for consideration by the full Commission is previewed in a three-page fact sheet that sets forth the proposed rules, which are built on the three core principles of choice, transparency, and security.

In order to “provide the tools consumers need to make smart choices about protecting their information—and enforce the broadband provider’s responsibility to do so,” the FCC proposes that ISPs obtain affirmative opt-in consent for the use and sharing of customer data that has not been specifically collected for the purpose of providing broadband Internet related services.

ComplexDiscovery combines original industry research with curated expert articles to create an informational resource that helps legal, business, and information technology professionals better understand the business and practice of data discovery and legal discovery.

All contributions are invested to support the development and distribution of ComplexDiscovery content. Contributors can make as many article contributions as they like, but will not be asked to register and pay until their contribution reaches $5.