From Glass House to Glassdoor? Transparency in the Workplace

Transparency is a growing feature of the world we live in, including the modern workplace. Workers, including those in the legal industry, have decided that Glassdoor ratings and reviews are worthy of their consideration.

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Two extracts from recent articles by Bill Henderson and Evan Parker as published on the Legal Evolution Blog

Workplace Transparency, Part I: Is It Time To Take Glassdoor Seriously

How many readers find value from ratings and reviews on YelpAngie’s ListConsumer ReportsHealthgradesTrip AdvisorAmazon and Ebay?

That’s what we thought.  We use them too.

What about Glassdoor, the website that rates companies based upon employee reviews?  If you’re an employer or part of company management, you might view Glassdoor as an unwelcome development, as it provides a platform for current and ex-employees to air grievances, all while enjoying the protection of online anonymity.

On the other hand, if you’re a Millennial or Gen Z trying to evaluate your career options, there’s a good chance you value Glassdoor’s ratings, reviews and salary information, particularly when comparing employers in the same industry. We know this because Alexa ranks Glassdoor #404 among all websites globally and #94 among US-based websites. The average time spent on the website is 3 minutes 42 seconds (compare New York Times at #116 and 3 minutes 30 seconds).

In this post, we take the position that debates over Glassdoor are beside the point. Transparency is a growing feature of the world we live in, including the modern workplace.  Workers, including those in the legal industry, have decided that Glassdoor ratings and reviews are worthy of their consideration. Thus, let’s study the data and see what we can learn from it.

Read the complete article at Workplace Transparency, Part I: Is It Time To Take Glassdoor Seriously?

Workplace Transparency, Part II: A Roadmap for Law Firms

The legal market circa 2019 is in the early days of lawyers discovering, learning, and mastering principles of professional management, including sophisticated notions of leadership and employee/team development. This is going to happen because we are far along the pathway of several hundred high-quality regional law firms converging into a single national and global market. If Firm A resists the principles of professional management, it will be vanquished by Firm B. In the end, talent votes with their feet, with the transparency of the modern workplace telling them where to apply.

Read the complete article at Workplace Transparency, Part II: A Roadmap for Law Firms

Additional Reading

Source: ComplexDiscovery

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