A Pandemeconomic Indicator? Summer 2020 eDiscovery Pricing Survey Results

Based on the complexity of data and legal discovery, it is a continual challenge to fully understand what is representative of industry-standard pricing for the delivery of eDiscovery products and services. With this challenge in mind, the semi-annual eDiscovery Pricing Survey is designed to provide insight into eDiscovery pricing through the lens of 15 specific questions answered by legal, business, security, and information professionals operating in the eDiscovery ecosystem. The summer 2020 survey was open from May 11, 2020, until May 20, 2020, and had 105 respondents share their understanding of the pricing of eDiscovery services.

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Classifications, Concerns, and Concepts: Reference Architectures and the Industrial Internet of Things

The expected disruptive developments collectively referred to as the Internet of Things (IoT) have drawn significant attention in many industries, disciplines, and organizations. While the concrete benefits and requirements are still not sufficiently clear, the general agreement on its relevance and impact is undeniable. As a result, a large number of initiatives and consortia from industry and research have been formed to all set the de facto standards and best practices. This work contributes to the state of the art by providing a structured analysis of existing reference frameworks, their classifications, and the concerns they target.

A Matter of Pricing? A Running Update of Semi-Annual eDiscovery Pricing Survey Responses

First administered in December of 2018 and conducted four times during the last two years with 334 individual responses, the semi-annual eDiscovery Pricing Survey highlights pricing on selected collection, processing, and review tasks. The aggregate results of all surveys as shared in the provided comparative charts may be helpful for understanding pricing and its impact on purchasing behavior on selected services over time.

Five Great Reads on eDiscovery for May 2020

From review market sizing revisions to pandemeconomic pricing, the May 2020 edition of the Five Great Reads on eDiscovery newsletter provides a selection of recent research, reports, and articles to update and inform legal, business, and information technology professionals in the eDiscovery ecosystem.

Considering Cybersecurity? National Cyber Security in Practice: A New Handbook

“There are several international standards and guidelines for developing the cybersecurity of a single organization, but it is difficult to find comprehensive tools for national governments. This handbook – National Cyber Security in Practice – is designed to fill that gap. The articles, written by seasoned experts, will give the reader an overview of the key elements that underpin the cybersecurity architecture of any country,” highlighted Arvo Ott, Chairman of the Management Board of e-Governance Academy.

A Pandemeconomic Indicator? Summer 2020 eDiscovery Pricing Survey Results

Based on the complexity of data and legal discovery, it is a continual challenge to fully understand what is representative of industry-standard pricing for the delivery of eDiscovery products and services. With this challenge in mind, the semi-annual eDiscovery Pricing Survey is designed to provide insight into eDiscovery pricing through the lens of 15 specific questions answered by legal, business, security, and information professionals operating in the eDiscovery ecosystem. The summer 2020 survey was open from May 11, 2020, until May 20, 2020, and had 105 respondents share their understanding of the pricing of eDiscovery services.

A Relevant Ransomware Scenario: The Targeting of Municipal Governments and Healthcare Providers

One of the cyber scenarios highlighted in the Cyber Law Toolkit describes the potential use of ransomware against municipal governments and healthcare providers. Given the pandemic and recession constraints in today’s world, this scenario and its potential implications are more relevant than ever and worthy of consideration by legal, business, and information technology professionals.

[Legal Education Webcast] Handling Non-Traditional Data Sources in eDiscovery

With data originating from Slack to talking refrigerators and from robots, doorbells, thermometers, and other IoT devices, what does the potential deluge of data look like, and how are you going to collect, process, review, and produce it? Join our panel of experts as we explore some of the non-traditional data sources that litigants are faced with today and what they may face in the future.

The Age of Consent? European Data Protection Board Guidance on Consent Under the GDPR

The European Data Protection Board (EDPB) is an independent European body that contributes to the consistent application of data protection rules throughout the European Union and promotes cooperation between the EU’s data protection authorities. The following update shares an overview of recent EDPB guidance on the concept of consent under the EU General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR).

A World of Difference: Technology-Assisted Review in the Fight Against COVID-19

Using Continuous Active Learning® (CAL®) Technology-Assisted Review (TAR) — a supervised machine learning approach that Professors Grossman and Cormack originally developed to expedite the review of documents in high-stakes legal cases — they have now applied this same method to automate literature searches in massive databases containing health-related studies for systematic reviews.

Seamless Security? Elevating Global Cyber Risk Management Through Interoperable Frameworks

“The Coalition to Reduce Cyber Risk (CR2) is calling for a global approach to cybersecurity risk management underpinned by interoperable frameworks,” said Alexander Niejelow, President of the CR2 Board of Directors and Senior Vice President of Cybersecurity Coordination and Advocacy for Mastercard. “Our companies recognize that good cybersecurity risk management rests on a common security baseline of practices as well as a common taxonomy and lexicon. By recognizing this common core as a global standard, companies can more effectively reduce risk as we work across multiple economies and sectors.”