5 Hot Takes on Future of E-Discovery in Legal Industry

With the vast expanse of data streams available, Francis predicted that attorneys will be likely to start bringing new kinds of data to the table in litigation. That said, without the sophistication to do cost-effective e-discovery tools to new kinds of data, the average cost of getting through relevant data is likely to trend upward.

Extract from article by Gabrielle Orum Hernandez

Panelists at Legalweek’s last panel of the conference, “Predictions on the Future of e-Discovery Law, Business, and Practice,” were asked to cast predictions about the future of the practice. Moderator David Horrigan, e-discovery counsel and legal content director at kCura, armed panelists with loud buzzers to approve or reject fellow panelists’ ideas.

The panel and crowd had a lively debate over these proposed ideas:

Judge James Francis IV, U.S. magistrate judge: “E-discovery costs are headed up.”

With the vast expanse of data streams available, Francis predicted that attorneys will be likely to start bringing new kinds of data to the table in litigation. That said, without the sophistication to do cost-effective e-discovery tools to new kinds of data, the average cost of getting through relevant data is likely to trend upward.

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