Choosing a Cloud Provider for Business Innovation

Much of the discussion about cloud services remains focused on the needs of less-mature organizations and on technical rather than business considerations. Debate concentrates on whether to move to the cloud, which workloads are best to “lift and shift” from a cost, security and compliance perspective or how to avoid supplier lock-in, currently one of the biggest concerns when moving to the cloud.

Extract from an article by Nicholas McQuire

To stay relevant in today’s world of instant customer satisfaction and growing competition from tech-savvy upstarts, more and more established enterprises are fully embracing cloud technologies. Almost 60% of large organizations in our latest survey of IT decision-makers, for example, stated that migrating key applications and services to the cloud is their top IT priority in 2019.

However, much of the discussion about cloud services remains focused on the needs of less-mature organizations and on technical rather than business considerations. Debate concentrates on whether to move to the cloud, which workloads are best to “lift and shift” from a cost, security and compliance perspective or how to avoid supplier lock-in, currently one of the biggest concerns when moving to the cloud.

Demand for multi- and hybrid-cloud services, as well as open-source technologies such as Kubernetes containers, has increased over the past 12 months as a result. With over half of enterprises now using more than one public cloud provider, multi- and hybrid-cloud technologies help developers spin up infrastructure for new applications or lift-and-shift projects while maintaining consistency and portability across their on-premises IT, multiple public clouds and at the network edge. Another effect is IT departments can now choose suppliers far more flexibly, often one workload at time.

As positive as these trends have been, they reflect the immaturity of the cloud services market: Less than 20% of enterprise workloads have actually migrated to the cloud and many customers early in their cloud journeys remain cautious in their approaches to the major suppliers.

Machine learning and, more broadly, AI have become the tech industry’s most important trends over the past 18 months. Firms that best prioritize collecting, analyzing and gaining insights from their data will acquire the biggest source of competitive advantage over the next five years. It is therefore vital to consider a cloud provider with the widest experience, technology portfolio and services in these areas.

Source: ComplexDiscovery