AI and Automation: From Removing Workers to Improving Quality

Just because a task can be automated doesn’t always mean that people will get replaced. In the 30 years after ATMs were introduced, the number of bank tellers increased slightly. Removing workers is one response to automation, but improving quality is another option to pursue. 

Why AI Won’t Replace Your Manager

Extract from an article by Sam Marshall from CMS Wire

Although the headline that gets the clicks is “AI is taking our jobs,” the current reality is that “Automation is replacing some of our tasks.” I know, it’s nowhere near as catchy.

I say automation rather than AI because it doesn’t really matter what technology the underlying system uses, so long as it does the job well. For example, being a bank teller was a human job requiring intelligence, but there’s no AI in an ATM cash machine (when it comes to technology evolution, some of them don’t even seem to have caught up to Windows Vista yet).

I also prefer “tasks” over “jobs” because mostly AI can only do certain elements. MIT professor Erik Brynjolfsson, one of the authors who, with Andrew McAfee, first wrote about this trend in “Race Against the Machine” has more recently been emphasizing the need to redesign jobs around AI opportunities.

Note that just because a task can be automated doesn’t always mean that people will get replaced. In the 30 years after ATMs were introduced, the number of bank tellers increased slightly.

Removing workers is one response to automation, but improving quality is another option to pursue.

Additional Reading

Source: ComplexDiscovery