A.I. Is Doing Legal Work. But It Won’t Replace Lawyers, Yet.

Impressive advances in artificial intelligence technology tailored for legal work have led some lawyers to worry that their profession may be Silicon Valley’s next victim. But recent research and even the people working on the software meant to automate legal work say the adoption of A.I. in law firms will be a slow, task-by-task process.

Extract from article by Steve Lohr

In January, the McKinsey Global Institute found that while nearly half of all tasks could be automated with current technology, only 5 percent of jobs could be entirely automated. Applying its definition of current technology — widely available or at least being tested in a lab — McKinsey estimates that 23 percent of a lawyer’s job can be automated.

Technology will unbundle aspects of legal work over the next decade or two rather than the next year or two, legal experts say. Highly paid lawyers will spend their time on work on the upper rungs of the legal task ladder. Other legal services will be performed by nonlawyers — the legal equivalent of nurse practitioners — or by technology.

Corporate clients often are no longer willing to pay high hourly rates to law firms for junior lawyers to do routine work. Those tasks are already being automated and outsourced, both by the firms themselves and by outside suppliers like Axiom, Thomson Reuters, Elevate and the Big Four accounting firms.

Impressive advances in artificial intelligence technology tailored for legal work have led some lawyers to worry that their profession may be Silicon Valley’s next victim. But recent research and even the people working on the software meant to automate legal work say the adoption of A.I. in law firms will be a slow, task-by-task process. In other words, like it or not, a robot is not about to replace your lawyer. At least, not anytime soon.

The Spring 2020 eDiscovery Business Confidence Survey

This is the eighteenth time the quarterly eDiscovery Business Confidence Survey has been conducted by ComplexDiscovery. It is also the first time the survey has been conducted in a time of worldwide crisis. The current global coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic is altering life as we know it. It is also altering the business environment of everyone in the eDiscovery ecosystem.

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This spring survey will provide important insight into the business confidence of executive leaders, operational managers, and tactical execution professionals as we collectively seek to understand the impact of the current global COVID-19 pandemic on the business of eDiscovery.

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Your opinion is important in helping form a complete picture of the business confidence of those operating in the realm of eDiscovery and your responses to this survey are fully anonymized, with no individual or organizational contact data, demographics, or answers being shared. And upon closing of the survey, I will send you a direct link to the published results.

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